An Update on the Political Turmoil in Venezuela

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An Update on the Political Turmoil in Venezuela

Photo found @RT_com

Photo found @RT_com

Photo found @RT_com

Luis Bronfield Pinto '20, Staff Writer

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The crisis in Venezuela hasn’t gotten better, if anything it has gotten more intense.

At the end of March, Russia sent troops to Venezuela, causing Russia and the United States to enter a battle over influence.  Around 100 Russians arrived in Caracas, the capital of Venezuela, with unidentified equipment. Although it isn’t clear why they arrived, many fear that they arrived to support Maduro, and protect him from the U.S. overthrowing Maduro. In recent years, Russia has sent a few military advisers to Venezuela, but 100 military personnel is a lot more than usual. U.S. officials are still cautious, because of the possibility that Russia will intervene in Venezuela, like they did in Syria. President Trump has even gone so far as to warn Russia to “Get out”, according to Vox.

The crisis has escalated to the point where the U.S. National Security Advisor, John Bolton, warned Russia that any actions against military operations in Venezuela, or other parts of South America by outsider, would be seen as a “threat to world peace”. Meanwhile, Russia has replied with “more restrained language, at times trolling and taunting” the United States.   

According to Vox, in January, the Trump administration and other governments in Latin America and Europe, have called for Maduro to “step down”, due to the economic and humanitarian crisis which Venezuela is experiencing. The country’s administrative rebellion against Maduro is being led by Juan Guaidó, who has officially been acknowledged by the U.S. and others as Venezuela’s rightful leader.

The Venezuelan government has prohibited Guaidó from holding public office for 15 years, the maximum punishment allowed by law. Although he cannot hold office for 15 years, according to The Washington Post, the National Assembly leader stood his ground and insisted that this action would not stop his plan to force Maduro out of office.

If you don’t know what is going on in Venezuela, read my previous article on Venezuela at whschief.com.

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